Thursday, February 19, 2004

Film makers join revulsion at Pepsi RIAA doublespeak
By Andrew Orlowski in San Francisco
Posted: 18/02/2004 at 00:15 GMT

Award-winning film maker and Apple user Brian Flemming has become the second artist to release his critique of the now notorious SuperBowl commercial, which promoted Apple's iTunes store.

Documentary film maker James Saldana posted his annotated parody version here.

Now director Flemming, who created the intriguing spoof documentary Nothing So Strange about reaction to the fictional assassination of Bill Gates has juxtaposed the idealism of Apple's 1984 Superbowl commercial with its Pepsi-sponsored, RIAA-blessed counterpart.

"I'm still a huge Apple fan, as I have been for years," explains Brian on his weblog. "Apple's products have had a huge, and positive, influence on my life. That's why I'm so let down by Apple's involvement in this propaganda. Pepsi sells slow poison to children - it's hardly surprising that they'd stoop to this. From Apple I expected better."

In Orwell's 1984, Flemming reminds us, "Television is a key device used by The Party to lie to citizens and keep them afraid and obedient? Facts that The Party finds contrary to its purpose are dropped down the Memory Hole, and new facts are manufactured to replace them."

Fast forward 20 years, and a few facts have dropped down:

"Despite Apple/Pepsi's wording, no target of the RIAA suits was charged with a crime ... However, many parents and kids watching this commercial are
likely unaware of the fact. Fear is a primary means used by The Party to maintain control over expression in 1984."

"Fear is also a potent weapon used by the RIAA to exert control over the behaviour of music fans," adds Flemming, noting the fraudulent use of
paramilitary tactics to bust a 4 foot 11 inch high Mexican parking lot attendant in Los Angeles before Christmas. (Although it doesn't seem to be working.)